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Classic Cars To Invest In Now


As time marches on, what we often think of as modern cars suddenly move into classic territory

 

Models that you thought might be worth a few hundred pounds could be rising in value quickly.

 

Here, we look at a variety of cars that are good prospects for those looking to invest in a classic that could be worth quite a bit more in years to come.

 

PORSCHE 911

 

Now more than 50 years old, the 911 has been produced since 1963.

 

And while some might criticise it as a car that hasn’t visually changed much in that time, it has been a model that has constantly evolved and it is heralded as one of the purest sports cars out there. There have been many versions over the years and a new one these days will cost you at least £74,000 and can be as much as double as you move up the range.

 

 

 

 

The archetypal sports car is already a classic, but ‘newer’ versions are rapidly climbing in value. The ones to start getting your hands on are examples from the 1980s, which are already commanding £10,000 to £20,000.

 

But that’s not a lot for a legendary car and they’re only likely to climb in value in years to come.

 

MERCEDES-BENZ 190E

 

This one could be a real winner if you’re looking for a classic to invest in.

 

Once a common sight on European roads, the 190, which was known as the ‘Baby Benz’ as it sat under the E-Class in the range, saw more than 1,800,000 examples built between 1982 and 1993. It was an early car to include some decent safety tech, such as airbags and ABS, and the E is one to look for because it was fuel-injected, giving it more power and better economy.

 

 

 

 

At the moment, a 190 can be had for mere hundreds of pounds, with the 190E still being seen on sale for less than £1,000. But, as more modern cars like these from the last 20 or 30 years rapidly become sought-after classics, this is a motor that could make you money in a relatively short time span – if you can bear to part with a great piece of German engineering.

 

MITSUBISHI LANCER EVO

 

Unbelievably, the Lancer is nearly 25 years old, having first been produced in 1992.

 

Thanks to its rallying exploits in the 1990s at the hands of drivers like Tommi Makinen, it, in its battles with the Subaru Impreza, gained a legion of fans who wanted to emulate their heroes. Road-going versions became ever more powerful and cars from the 1990s are now only going one way in terms of value, especially specials like the Tommi Makinen Edition.

 

 

 

 

 

Values are rising rapidly, so it’s a good investment – but be careful when buying as many versions have been heavily modified. An unmolested example is the way to go. You can pick one up for as little as £7,000 or £8,000. Hold on to it and it’ll be worth a lot more in years to come.

 

And, if your allegiance is with Subaru, the same applies.

 

AUDI TT (FIRST GENERATION)

 

It’s hard to believe that the first generation Audi TT hit the roads nearly 20 years ago. It began life several years before that and was revealed to the public in 1995, its design immediately drawing plenty of praise. Its sleek, seamless, lines are timeless and the original car still looks modern today.

 

 

 

 

But it is rapidly reaching the age where its value could be set to increase, rather than decrease. The first gen was made until 2006, but what we’re talking about here are the early cars from 1998 – and certainly pre-2000. Right now ball park money for one of these early examples is around £1,500 to £2,000 – and for that you’ve got a great car regardless.

 

But, if you look after it and hold on to it, in five or 10 years’ time the original TT could well be worth substantially more.

 

VW GOLF GTI (MK2)

 

The original GTI is already a classic and worth in the region of £20,000. The first generation is rightly heralded as the father of the hot hatch and rightly so. But the Mark 2 is also well into classic territory now as well and is certainly one to watch.

 

 

 

 

Manufactured between 1983 and 1992, more than 6,000,000 examples of the MK2 car were made in total. It was larger and heavier than the lithe Mark 1, but is already rising in value rapidly. But at the moment it costs a fraction of what a Mark 1 will set you back – with prices between £4,000 and £10,000 depending on condition.

 

If it goes the way of its predecessor, then you will be seeing a very good return in years to come.

 

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